Hana Shalabi’s Sister Speaks

Zahera Shalabi is the sister of Hana Shalabi, a 29 year-old woman from the village of Burqin in the Jenin district in Palestine. In February 2012, the Shalabi’s home was raided and Hana was arrested. She has since been in Israeli prison under what is called Administrative Detention where over 300 Palestinians are held without charge or trial. Zahera speaks about her sister as a young woman who is an artist and a dreamer who never hurt anyone. She speaks of the struggles her family has been going through since Hana was arrested. Shalabi’s parents have both been on hunger strike in solidarity with their daughter. As Hana Shalabi could be dying in prison, her father appeals to the whole world to hear their call and to put pressure on the Israeli government to release his daughter. In his own words, “Hana is not only my daughter, she is the daughter of every Palestinian.”

[note: This video was shot and edited by Vivien Sansour, with editing support by ListenIn Pictures]

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About viviensansour

Vivien Sansour is a life style writer and photographer. She is capturing the stories of the farmers of the Palestine Fair Trade Association for the wider world. Vivien was Communications Manager/Life and Culture Specialist at The Institute for Middle East Understanding (IMEU) prior to joining Canaan. Vivien is an activist and organizer. She has been involved in social justice issues and organizing communities in Honduras, India, Uruguay, Palestine, Colombia, and the United States. She is frequently invited to participate in panels, shows, conferences, and civic events to speak about the Palestinian experience. Vivien has exhibited her work internationally in the United States, Europe, and Palestine. Vivien was co-founder and producer/writer for the Los Angeles based non- profit ImaginAction where she organized and led the wildly successful Olive Tree Circus to tour Palestine in 2008. The Olive Tree Circus used humor, play, music and art to help Palestinian farmers access their olive fields during the olive harvest. Vivien is a native of Beit Jala, Palestine where she grew up under Israeli military occupation. She has both a B.A. in Political Science with a minor in Theatre Arts, and an M.A. in International Studies with a focus in Anthropology from East Carolina University. She is interested in Agriculture as a form of resistance. In the Canaan Fair Trade spirit Vivien tells the stories of Insisting on Life. While she lives between Los Angeles and Jenin, Vivien dreams of having her own sustainable farm one day in her hometown of Beit Jala, Palestine.
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2 Responses to Hana Shalabi’s Sister Speaks

  1. Pingback: Concern for Hana Shalabi on Month-Long Hunger Strike in ‘Administrative Detention’ | Haiti Chery

  2. Pingback: Hana Shalabi: ‘our freedom is even more precious and more powerful than their cells’ | Haiti Chery

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Hana Shalabi’s Sister Speaks

Zahera Shalabi is the sister of Hana Shalabi, a 29 year-old woman from the village of Burqin in the Jenin district in Palestine. In February 2012, the Shalabi’s home was raided and Hana was arrested. She has since been in Israeli prison under what is called Administrative Detention where over 300 Palestinians are held without charge or trial. Zahera speaks about her sister as a young woman who is an artist and a dreamer who never hurt anyone. She speaks of the struggles her family has been going through since Hana was arrested. Shalabi’s parents have both been on hunger strike in solidarity with their daughter. As Hana Shalabi could be dying in prison, her father appeals to the whole world to hear their call and to put pressure on the Israeli government to release his daughter. In his own words, “Hana is not only my daughter, she is the daughter of every Palestinian.”

[note: This video was shot and edited by Vivien Sansour, with editing support by ListenIn Pictures]

About viviensansour

Vivien Sansour is a life style writer and photographer. She is capturing the stories of the farmers of the Palestine Fair Trade Association for the wider world. Vivien was Communications Manager/Life and Culture Specialist at The Institute for Middle East Understanding (IMEU) prior to joining Canaan. Vivien is an activist and organizer. She has been involved in social justice issues and organizing communities in Honduras, India, Uruguay, Palestine, Colombia, and the United States. She is frequently invited to participate in panels, shows, conferences, and civic events to speak about the Palestinian experience. Vivien has exhibited her work internationally in the United States, Europe, and Palestine. Vivien was co-founder and producer/writer for the Los Angeles based non- profit ImaginAction where she organized and led the wildly successful Olive Tree Circus to tour Palestine in 2008. The Olive Tree Circus used humor, play, music and art to help Palestinian farmers access their olive fields during the olive harvest. Vivien is a native of Beit Jala, Palestine where she grew up under Israeli military occupation. She has both a B.A. in Political Science with a minor in Theatre Arts, and an M.A. in International Studies with a focus in Anthropology from East Carolina University. She is interested in Agriculture as a form of resistance. In the Canaan Fair Trade spirit Vivien tells the stories of Insisting on Life. While she lives between Los Angeles and Jenin, Vivien dreams of having her own sustainable farm one day in her hometown of Beit Jala, Palestine.
Video | This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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